How I Treat: Bringing Science to Clinical Dilemmas

The “How I Treat: Bringing Science to Clinical Dilemmas” sessions are designed to provide an opportunity for a small number of attendees to meet with a clinical expert in a setting that fosters interaction. This year, ASH has invited experts from all over the world to facilitate informal discussions allowing participants to present their questions and gain new perspectives. A boxed lunch will be provided.

Ticket Prices (per session)
Member: $45
Associate Member: $45
Medical Student, Graduate Student, or Resident Member: $45
Non-Member in Training: $45
Allied Health Professional: $45
Non-Member: $60

The “How I Treat: Bringing Science to Clinical Dilemmas” sessions are restricted to medical professionals only; no businesspersons or media will be admitted. Tickets are limited and only available on site on a first-come, first-served basis. Only one ticket per person is allowed. Tickets can be purchased at the Ticketed Sessions counter in the registration area of the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center beginning Thursday, December 5, during registration hours until all tickets are sold. The room assignment will be indicated on the ticket and in the on-site materials. Please check your ticket carefully to ensure proper date, time, location, and session choice.

Attention Trainees!
A number of tickets for the “How I Treat: Bringing Science to Clinical Dilemmas” sessions will be reserved especially for trainees. Proof of status as an Associate member; Medical Student, Graduate Student, Resident member; or non-member in training will be required to purchase a ticket. Please show your name badge to the staff at the Ticketed Sessions counter at the registration area in the Great Hall of the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center.

Saturday, December 7, 2013
11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Sunday, December 8, 2013
11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

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Saturday, December 7, 2013
11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Hilton New Orleans Riverside (Grand Salon 15)

Michaela Liedtke, MD
Stanford University Cancer Center
Stanford, CA

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Allogeneic Transplant for High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Hilton New Orleans Riverside (Grand Salon 4)

Andrew Artz, MD
The University of Chicago
Chicago, IL

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Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Hilton New Orleans Riverside (Grand Salon 9)

William G. Wierda, MD, PhD
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Houston, TX

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Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

Hilton New Orleans Riverside (Grand Salon 6)

Jorge E. Cortes, MD
The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center
Houston, TX

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Multiple Myeloma

Hilton New Orleans Riverside (Grand Salon 10)

Andrzej J. Jakubowiak, MD, PhD
University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center
Ann Arbor, MI

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Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Hilton New Orleans Riverside (Grand Salon 18)

Mantle cell lymphoma remains among the most challenging of the non-Hodgkin lymphomas to manage due to its marked clinical and biologic heterogeneity. Rapid advances have been made in our understanding of the MCL clinical spectrum, with improved approaches to risk-stratification for individual patients and the advent of the B-cell receptor inhibitors, immunomodulatory agents and other targeted agents. This session will review evolving treatment options, therapeutic sequencing, the emerging role of novel targeted therapeutics, as well as transplant and maintenance approaches that are improving MCL patient outcomes and survival.

Michael E. Williams, MD, ScM
University of Virginia School of Medicine
Charlottesville, VA

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Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

Hilton New Orleans Riverside (Grand Salon 19)

Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) is clinically, morphologically and biologically heterogeneous. In this informal discussion, we will explore the implications of new information on the biologic basis of clinical behavior in DLBCL for patient care. We will discuss ways in which our growing understanding of biologic diversity in DLBCL can inform clinical practice and trials.

Jane N. Winter, MD
Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University
Chicago, IL

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Hemophilia

Hilton New Orleans Riverside (Grand Salon 12)

Neil Josephson, MD
Puget Sound Blood Center
Seattle, WA

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AIDS Lymphoma

Hilton New Orleans Riverside (Grand Salon 7)

Richard F Little, MPH, MD
National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health
Bethesda, MD

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Hemochromatosis

Hilton New Orleans Riverside (Grand Salon 13)

Susan F. Leitman, MD
National Institutes of Health
Bethesda, MD

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Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia

Hilton New Orleans Riverside (Grand Salon 3)

Gowthami Arepally, MD
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC

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Sunday, December 8, 2013
11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Hilton New Orleans Riverside (Grand Salon 12)

William Blum, MD
The Ohio State University
Columbus, OH

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Hodgkin Lymphoma

Hilton New Orleans Riverside (Grand Salon 7)

Significant advances have been made in the biology, prognosis, and treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) over the past several decades. A significant amount of knowledge has been learned in the biology of HL, in particular regarding phenotypic and genetic alterations of malignant cells, the associated oncogenic signaling pathways, and the importance of the microenvironment. Clinical trials and other research analyses have defined clinically relevant prognostic categories for patients with early-stage and advanced-stage HL as well as for unique patient populations such as older patients with HL. In addition, refined therapeutic regimens and new treatment paradigms have continued to improve outcomes for HL patients, while we have more fully recognized the acute and long-term morbid and potentially fatal side effects of HL therapy. Furthermore, recent clinical studies have been developed in a concerted effort to maintain curability and concomitantly reduce treatment-related toxicities.

Dr. Evens will review current concepts related to the biology of HL with emphasis on the impact on patient prognosis and implications towards the development of rational therapeutic strategies. He will discuss the applications of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in the early assessment of chemotherapy sensitivity including recent and current clinical trials that incorporate PET response-adapted strategies. He will also review current standard therapy for patients with newly diagnosed early-stage and advanced-stage HL as well as discuss new treatment paradigms including the incorporation of novel therapeutic agents.

Andrew M Evens, DO, MSc
Tufts Medical Center and Tufts University School of Medicine
Boston, MA

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Myelodysplastic Syndromes

Hilton New Orleans Riverside (Grand Salon 4)

Guillermo Garcia-Manero, MD
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Houston, TX

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Myeloproliferative Diseases

Hilton New Orleans Riverside (Grand Salon 15)

Jason Gotlib, MD, MS
Stanford University School of Medicine
Stanford, CA

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Follicular Lymphomas

Hilton New Orleans Riverside (Grand Salon 6)

Christopher Flowers, MD
Winship Cancer Institute at Emory University
Atlanta, GA

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Infant Leukemia

Hilton New Orleans Riverside (Grand Salon 10)

Patrick Brown, MD
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Baltimore, MD

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Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis

Hilton New Orleans Riverside (Grand Salon 18)

Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is not an independent disease but a hyperinflammatory syndrome. Persistent stimulation of lymphocytes and histiocytes results in high levels of cytokines leading to the characteristic clinical symptoms and laboratory findings. The detection of several genetic defects in familial HLH (FHL) which all affect the function of cytotoxic cells has shed light into its pathophysiology. Treatment is directed at suppressing the high cytokine levels and eliminating activated and infected cells. This is often a balancing act between the necessity to prevent the dangerous effects of hypercytokinemia and the concern for side-effects of immune-suppressive and cytostatic therapy. In FHL the immune defect has to be restored by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

Gritta E. Janka, MD, PhD
University Medical Center Eppendorf
Hamburg, Germany

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Aplastic Anemia

Hilton New Orleans Riverside (Grand Salon 22)

Neal S. Young, MD
National Institutes of Health
Bethesda, MD

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Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disease

Hilton New Orleans Riverside (Grand Salon 9)

Helen E. Heslop, MD
Baylor College of Medicine
Houston, TX

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Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

Hilton New Orleans Riverside (Grand Salon 3)

The goal of this session will be to discuss how to translate new data from laboratory and clinical research into practical patient management, and how to translate clinical experience into valuable research observations.

James N. George, MD
University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
Oklahoma City, OK

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Thromboembolic Disease

Hilton New Orleans Riverside (Grand Salon 13)

Kenneth A. Bauer, MD
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Boston, MA

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Sickle Cell Disease

Hilton New Orleans Riverside (Grand Salon 19)

The last decade has witnessed significant progress in the management and prevention on complications among adults and children with sickle cell disease. Stem cell transplantation, hydroxyurea and blood transfusions are now commonly used based on clinical trial results, and new modalities of therapy are being developed. Furthermore, significant new data are now available concerning the pathophysiology of the disease and the clinical course of complications. The application of findings from clinical trials and new scientific data will be brought to bear on three case scenarios: a. Prevention of neurologic complications in a child. B. An adult with shortness of breath. C. Recurrent episodes of acute chest syndrome in an adolescent.

Miguel R. Abboud, MD, MHA
American University of Beirut Medical Center
Beirut, Lebanon

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